What the Bible Says About Divorce

What the Bible Says About Divorce

Begging, pleading and using logic were common tactics I employed to try and talk my wife out of divorcing me. I would go to the bible and show her what the bible says about divorce and why it was wrong and how God hates divorce, I suggested counseling and time apart to work through our issues but nothing I said or did would change her mind. It seems, once a person has made their mind up about something it can be nearly impossible to change it. Often this is due to them already meeting someone new that is fulfilling their needs and their life seems better (at least in the short-term).

Nevertheless, everyone’s situation is unique and things may turn out different. When I was searching for answers and what the bible says about divorce; here is what I found.

What does the Bible Say About Divorce

First of all, no matter what view one takes in the issue of divorce it is important to remember the words of the Bible from Malachi 2:16a: “I hate divorce, says the Lord God of Israel.” According to the Bible, God’s plan is that marriage be a lifetime commitment. “So they are no longer two, but one. Therefore what God has joined together, let man not separate” (Matthew 19:6). God realizes, though, that since a marriage involves two sinful human beings, divorce is going to occur. In the Old Testament, He laid down some laws in order to protect the rights of divorcees, especially women (Deuteronomy 24:1-4). Jesus pointed out that these laws were given because of the hardness of people’s hearts, not because they were God’s desire (Matthew 19:8). Read full answer. Source GotQuestions.org

What are Biblical Grounds for Divorce?

Here is another great answer to the question, “What are Biblical grounds for divorce? When discussing what the Bible says about divorce, it is important to keep in mind the words of Malachi 2:16, “I hate divorce says the Lord God.” Whatever grounds the Bible possibly gives for divorce, that does not mean God desires a divorce to occur in those instances. Rather than asking “is ______ a grounds for divorce,” often the question should be “is _______ grounds for forgiveness, restoration, and/or counseling?” Read full answer. Source GotQuestions.org

The answers are pretty compelling and in my opinion on target. What I was able to get from them was that I was on the right track with what I believed. Sure my ex may not see things the same way but people need to rationalize the things they do, especially when it is contrary to God’s will.

I hope you receive comfort after reading the answers to these questions and maybe if you share them with your spouse God will use them to touch his or her heart.